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This information pertains to Summer Session 2013. If you would like to be notified when information about Summer Session 2014 is available, please sign up for e-mail updates.

Tales of Three Cities - Tokyo, Seoul, Beijing

May 30-July 24, 2011

The following information pertains to the last time this program was offered. If you would like to be notified via e-mail when new information is available, please subscribe to the Summer Session announcement list.

Please note: We are monitoring the devastating events in Japan and extend our condolences to all affected. Currently, this program includes a visit to Toyko. We will update this web page if that schedule should change.

Program Objective

Led by program directors Leonard Mirin and Yehre Suh, the program combines Professor Mirin⿿s interest and specialization in traditional Japanese architecture and the history of landscape and urbanism with Suh⿿s research on issues of modernism, globalization, and urbanism in East Asia and interest in the relationship of landscape and architecture.

In these three Asian cities, tradition and history still maintain a strong influence over the new. The program will examine this negotiation between old and new and will test urban theories and strategies pertaining to globalization and regionalism.

The Research Studio project will lead the research, analysis, and production during the program. The three cities will be the sites of research investigating the relationships of traditional and new urban conditions. Conditions of exception that negotiate the homogeneity of globalization relative to the traditional fabric of the city will be analyzed and documented to construct potential strategies of exception. The Studio will formulate a strategy of urban development and preservation for the three sites in Tokyo, Seoul, and Beijing.

History seminars in the program will study the traditional history of architecture, landscape, and urbanism of the three countries. Theory seminars will focus on the issues of colonization, modernization, and globalization in East Asia.

A comparative work on Tokyo, Seoul, and Beijing will be beneficial not only in expanding the knowledge of architectural history and conditions in the non-western hemisphere, but also in understanding the predicaments of globalization and regional development relative to architecture, landscape, and urbanism, especially in respect to such ⿿yet to develop⿝ countries as Vietnam, Indonesia, Malaysia, and India.