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Free summer events

Wednesday lectures

Thanks to the generosity of the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, all lectures will take place in Kennedy Hall's Call Auditorium.

Wednesday, July 1, 2015, 7:00 pm
Kennedy Hall
Spiders are the dominant terrestrial predators on earth, and their biology and behavior are fascinating. Learn all about them from Cornell's spider expert, Dr. Linda Rayor, star of Monster Bug Wars and award-winning senior lecturer in the Department of Entomology. Find out how these little cannibals work out conflicts between the sexes, what happens when spiders live together in groups, which animals find them tasty, and interesting details about the most poisonous spider in the world.

Cornell’s free summer events, which run from June 23 to July 31, include Tuesday performances at the Schwartz Center for the Performing Arts, Wednesday lectures at Call Auditorium* in Kennedy Hall, and Friday concerts on the Arts Quad. For more information, visit summer.cornell.edu/events, e-mail cusce@cornell.edu, or call 607.255.4987. If you need accommodations to participate in this event, please contact us as soon as possible.

*The School of Continuing Education and Summer Sessions thanks the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences for generously donating the use of Call Auditorium for the summer lecture series.
Wednesday, July 8, 2015, 7:00 pm
Kennedy Hall
Director of the Carl Sagan Institute and an associate professor in Cornell’s Department of Astronomy, Lisa Kaltenegger says we live in an age when we finally may be able to answer the millennia-old question, “Are we alone in the universe?” Although she’s not promising to answer the question, Kaltenegger will share her research on potentially habitable planets beyond our solar system in a free public lecture, “A Thousand New Worlds,” on July 8 at 7:00 p.m. in Call Auditorium.

Kaltenegger, who earned her doctorate in astrophysics from Karl Franzens University, has been examining alien worlds for biosignatures—the pre-conditions and indications of life. “We are on the cusp of discovery, mapping our place among the thousands of worlds in the night sky,” she says—adding that this new era of astronomic exploration and discovery will also “give us the opportunity to better understand our own planet, and perhaps even a glimpse into our future.”

Cornell’s free summer events, which run from June 23 to July 31, include Tuesday performances at the Schwartz Center for the Performing Arts, Wednesday lectures at Call Auditorium* in Kennedy Hall, and Friday concerts on the Arts Quad. For more information, visit summer.cornell.edu/events, e-mail cusce@cornell.edu, or call 607.255.4987. If you need accommodations to participate in this event, please contact us as soon as possible.

*The School of Continuing Education and Summer Sessions thanks the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences for generously donating the use of Call Auditorium for the summer lecture series.
Wednesday, July 15, 2015, 7:00 pm
Kennedy Hall
Although white Republicans in Washington regarded Reconstruction as a policy for the defeated Confederacy only, black activists and veterans hoped the post-Civil War era would bring dramatic change to the entire nation. By the end of the war (the same year that Cornell was founded), 179,000 African Americans had served in the army, but only in New England could black men vote on an equal basis with whites. New York State imposed a property qualification on blacks only, and not a single black veteran could vote in Lincoln’s Illinois.

On leave from Le Moyne College's History Department and recently the Merrill Family Visiting Professor of History at Cornell, Douglas Egerton will describe how activists struggled to win the right to vote after the war and why Frederick Douglass insisted that “the entire country requires reclamation.”

Cornell’s free summer events, which run from June 23 to July 31, include Tuesday performances at the Schwartz Center for the Performing Arts, Wednesday lectures at Call Auditorium* in Kennedy Hall, and Friday concerts on the Arts Quad. For more information, visit summer.cornell.edu/events, e-mail cusce@cornell.edu, or call 607.255.4987. If you need accommodations to participate in this event, please contact us as soon as possible.

*The School of Continuing Education and Summer Sessions thanks the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences for generously donating the use of Call Auditorium for the summer lecture series.
Wednesday, July 22, 2015, 7:00 pm
Kennedy Hall
Many of us know about the death of Julius Caesar from William Shakespeare's eponymous play—but what actually took place on the Ides of March, 44 BC, was quite different. Barry Strauss, Cornell’s Bowmar Professor in Humanistic Studies, chair of the Department of History, and author of the highly praised new book The Death of Caesar, will present a fresh analysis of the primary sources and the central characters surrounding the man and the legend. He'll talk about what drove a group of more than sixty senators to murder the head of state and why, after first supporting the deed, the public turned on them.

Cornell’s free summer events, which run from June 23 to July 31, include Tuesday performances at the Schwartz Center for the Performing Arts, Wednesday lectures at Call Auditorium* in Kennedy Hall, and Friday concerts on the Arts Quad. For more information, visit summer.cornell.edu/events, e-mail cusce@cornell.edu, or call 607.255.4987. If you need accommodations to participate in this event, please contact us as soon as possible.

*The School of Continuing Education and Summer Sessions thanks the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences for generously donating the use of Call Auditorium for the summer lecture series.
Wednesday, July 29, 2015, 7:00 pm
Kennedy Hall
What makes the world look the way it does? A major quest in computer graphics research has been to understand and virtually model the appearance of the real world. Kavita Bala, an associate professor in Cornell's Computer Science Department and Computer Graphics Program, will talk about the university's pioneering research in this area and describe how it has influenced practice in a broad range of applications, from architecture and industrial design to entertainment.

Cornell’s free summer events, which run from June 23 to July 31, include Tuesday performances at the Schwartz Center for the Performing Arts, Wednesday lectures at Call Auditorium* in Kennedy Hall, and Friday concerts on the Arts Quad. For more information, visit summer.cornell.edu/events, e-mail cusce@cornell.edu, or call 607.255.4987. If you need accommodations to participate in this event, please contact us as soon as possible.

*The School of Continuing Education and Summer Sessions thanks the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences for generously donating the use of Call Auditorium for the summer lecture series.

Past lectures