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Cornell University School of Continuing Education and Summer Sessions

Courses

ENGL 1131 FWS: Mastering College Reading and Writing

Course description

(summer only) This course is only offered in the Summer Session.

What does it mean to be a "good" reader or a "good" writer in college? In each section of this course, students receive extensive guidance from their instructors in the discovery and practice of helpful methods for fully exploring and appreciating what they read as well as guidance in planning, drafting, and writing essays about what is read and discussed in class. Each section of the course focuses on a particular topic drawn from a range of fields (e.g., literature, history, film, music). Reading assignments are limited in order to allow ample time for discussion and for personal attention to student writing. First-Year Writing Seminar.

In general, Cornell students are required to take two semesters of First-Year Writing Seminars. Also see your college requirements.

Classes

ENGL 1131 101-SEM On-campus program: Prefreshman Summer Program

Prefreshman Writing Seminar: Tales of Latin America

Number:1162
Class dates:June 25-August 7, 2018
Exam dates:Will be provided by instructor (see Final exams)
Days/times:M-F 10 AM - 11:15 AM Uris Hall 303
Credit:3
Grade:Graded
Instructor:Troyan, B. (bbt1)
Max. enroll:18
Restrictions:Intended for students participating in the Prefreshman Summer Program
To enroll:See Prefreshman Summer Program for enrollment information.

Tales of Latin America -- This course starts off with a question that students and instructors will attempt to answer throughout the semester: what makes Latin America a unique region in the world? A wide variety of readings will examine Latin America from different angles. These readings range from journalistic pieces to scholarly articles. While probing the past and present reality of Latin America, students will learn how to write and read critically. Throughout the summer, students will have the opportunity to revise and re-write their essays in a number of in class-writing workshops.

ENGL 1131 102-SEM On-campus program: Prefreshman Summer Program

Prefreshman Writing Seminar: Memoir and Memory

Number:1163
Class dates:June 25-August 7, 2018
Exam dates:Will be provided by instructor (see Final exams)
Days/times:M-F 11:30 AM - 12:45 PM Uris Hall G28
Credit:3
Grade:Graded
Instructor:Jefferis, S. (sbj3)
Max. enroll:18
Restrictions:Intended for students participating in the Prefreshman Summer Program
To enroll:See Prefreshman Summer Program for enrollment information.

Memoir and Memory -- How do authors construct their public, written selves? Since the self is, at best, a difficult and multi-faceted concept, we will consider a variety of texts, seeking to understand the choices of literary techniques used to tell the story of the remembered self, the self created by the author. A memoir such as Kincaid's My Brother or Tobias Wolff's This Boy's Life will figure in our investigation; other readings will be drawn from non-fiction profiles, reflective essays, plays (e.g., The Laramie Project), poems, and visual renderings (e.g. Maus). Through reading and the frequent writing of essays, including some personal essays, we will explore how and why people write about themselves, while always asking, "How does writing shape lived experience?" Enrollment is strictly limited to 18 students or fewer; the course is taught by a professor, with several full-time co-instructors.

ENGL 1131 103-SEM On-campus 6-week session

Enemies, a 'Love' Story?

Number:1164
Session:6-week session
Class dates:June 25-August 7, 2018
Exam dates:Will be provided by instructor (see Final exams)
Days/times:M-F 10 AM - 11:15 AM Goldwin Smith Hall 348
Credit:3
Grade:Graded
Instructor:Lorenz, P. (pal37)
Max. enroll:18
To enroll:This class is not available for online enrollment. To enroll, submit a paper enrollment form. Enroll now.

Enemies, a 'Love' Story? -- The birth of modern drama has been linked to the staging of interpersonal relationships, and in particular to relations of conflict, struggle, and hostility. Very often the hero of drama is at odds with an enemy. But what is an enemy? Is he personal or political, racial or religious? Inside us or outside? Is he a he, and if so, is there any escaping him? The course focuses on the figure of the enemy in plays by Sophocles, Shakespeare, Miller, and Wilson, while considering various conceptual models of enmity, from the Bible through Marx and Freud. In drama from the Renaissance through the twentieth century, how do playwrights stage the ways we love to hate and hate to love?

ENGL 1131 104-SEM On-campus 6-week session

Film, Fantasy, and the Bard

Number:1165
Session:6-week session
Class dates:June 25-August 7, 2018
Exam dates:Will be provided by instructor (see Final exams)
Days/times:M-F 8:30 AM - 9:45 AM Goldwin Smith Hall 348
Credit:3
Grade:Graded
Instructor:Intemann, E. (edi1)
Max. enroll:18
To enroll:This class is not available for online enrollment. To enroll, submit a paper enrollment form. Enroll now.

Film, Fantasy, and the Bard -- Where does the inspiration for popular culture come from? When we see a film or read a book, is the material original? Is Shakespeare something only to be read in high-school English classes, or do his plays have relevance in the 21st century? William Shakespeare rocked his generation with his words in the equivalent of our social media. His influence is still seen everywhere in today⿿s culture, from teen movies, to rock music, to cartoons. This course will examine A Midsummer Night⿿s Dream as reinterpreted in film and fantasy literature. We will view works that touch on the politics and pressures of gender and sexuality, that have the spectacle of aerial acts and video walls, that look at drug culture and altered realities. Writing assignments will cover such topics as how content relates to form, literary or dramatic; how our modern sensibility, our historical and cultural bias, and our use of media affect our perception of the work.

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