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Cornell University School of Continuing Education and Summer Sessions

Courses

ENGL 1131 FWS: Mastering College Reading and Writing

Course description

(summer only) This course is only offered in the Summer Session.

What does it mean to be a “good” reader or a “good” writer in college? In each section of this course, students receive extensive guidance from their instructors in the discovery and practice of helpful methods for fully exploring and appreciating what they read as well as guidance in planning, drafting, and writing essays about what is read and discussed in class. Each section of the course focuses on a particular topic drawn from a range of fields (e.g., literature, history, film, music). Reading assignments are limited in order to allow ample time for discussion and for personal attention to student writing.

In general, Cornell students are required to take two semesters of First-Year Writing Seminars. Also see your college requirements.

Classes

ENGL 1131 101-SEM On-campus program: Prefreshman Summer Program

Prefreshman Writing Seminar: Tales of Latin America

Number:1097
Class dates:June 24-August 6, 2019
Exam dates:Will be provided by instructor (see Final exams)
Days/times:M-F 10 AM - 11:15 AM Goldwin Smith Hall 348
Credit:3
Grade:Graded
Instructor:Troyan, B. (bbt1)
Max. enroll:18
Restrictions:Intended for students participating in the Prefreshman Summer Program
To enroll:See Prefreshman Summer Program for enrollment information.

This course starts off with a question that students and instructors will attempt to answer throughout the semester: what makes Latin America a unique region in the world? A wide variety of readings will examine Latin America from different angles. These readings range from journalistic pieces to scholarly articles. While probing the past and present reality of Latin America, students will learn how to write and read critically. Throughout the summer, students will have the opportunity to revise and re-write their essays in a number of in class-writing workshops.

ENGL 1131 102-SEM On-campus program: Prefreshman Summer Program

Prefreshman Writing Seminar: Memoir and Memory

Number:1098
Class dates:June 24-August 6, 2019
Exam dates:Will be provided by instructor (see Final exams)
Days/times:M-F 11:30 AM - 12:45 PM Goldwin Smith Hall 348
Credit:3
Grade:Graded
Instructor:Jefferis, S. (sbj3)
Max. enroll:18
Restrictions:Intended for students participating in the Prefreshman Summer Program
To enroll:See Prefreshman Summer Program for enrollment information.

How do authors construct their public, written selves? Since the self is, at best, a difficult and multi-faceted concept, we will consider a variety of texts, seeking to understand the choices of literary techniques used to tell the story of the remembered self, the self created by the author. A memoir such as Kincaid's My Brother or Tobias Wolff's This Boy's Life will figure in our investigation; other readings will be drawn from non-fiction profiles, reflective essays, plays (e.g., The Laramie Project), poems, and visual renderings (e.g. Maus). Through reading and the frequent writing of essays, including some personal essays, we will explore how and why people write about themselves, while always asking, "How does writing shape lived experience?" Enrollment is strictly limited to 18 students or fewer; the course is taught by a professor, with several full-time co-instructors.

ENGL 1131 103-SEM On-campus 6-week session

The Mystery in the Story

Number:1099
Session:6-week session
Class dates:June 24-August 6, 2019
Exam dates:Will be provided by instructor (see Final exams)
Days/times:M-F 10 AM - 11:15 AM White Hall B04
Credit:3
Grade:Graded
Instructor:Saccamano, N. (ncs5)
Max. enroll:18
To enroll:To enroll, complete and submit a course enrollment form and your payment to the Summer Session office. For more information, see enrollment and registration. Please note that late registration fees may apply.

The Mystery in the Story -- What makes a story, and what makes it a mystery story? In this course we'll study and write about the nature of narratives, taking the classic mystery tale written by such writers as Arthur Conan Doyle and Raymond Chandler as typical of intricately plotted stories of suspense and disclosure that have been written and filmed in many genres: Greek tragedy, horror stories by Poe and Lovecraft, hard-boiled fiction by Hammett, Chandler, and Mosley, postmodern mysteries by Borges, and a contemporary "hipster" or "funky" detective novel by Sara Gran. We'll look at the way they hold together, the desire and fear that drive them, and the secrets they tell -- or try to keep hidden.

ENGL 1131 104-SEM On-campus 6-week session

Challenges of Modernity

Number:1100
Session:6-week session
Class dates:June 24-August 6, 2019
Exam dates:Will be provided by instructor (see Final exams)
Days/times:M-F 8:30 AM - 9:45 AM White Hall B02
Credit:3
Grade:Graded
Instructor:Regenspan, B. (blr98)
Max. enroll:18
To enroll:To enroll, complete and submit a course enrollment form and your payment to the Summer Session office. For more information, see enrollment and registration. Please note that late registration fees may apply.

"Challenges of Modernity" -- How did developments in thinking during the era sometimes called "late modernity" (1830-1945) affect the way we act and think in the present--including ideas about love, community, race, and power? We'll study and write about some "late modern" ideas, also examining a range of contemporary influencers (including ourselves!) to speculate on how we arrived at the current socially and environmentally non-sustainable moment. This course will help you develop the skills of competent college readers and writers by embracing the process of writing and revision. It will also engage you in the ideas of thinkers such as Kant, Darwin, Marx, Freud, and Virginia Woolf, often in the light of philosopher Deborah Britzman's claim that "the confusion of education and love begins at birth."

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